MLB Roundup: Top 5 Stories From Around the League

With about two weeks of 2020 MLB spring training games in the books, the league has seen its fair share of intriguing headlines. This week alone has churned out some interesting sound bites from notorious Yankees’ cheater Alex Rodriguez, and petty antics from Red’s pitcher Trevor Bauer.

Let’s have a look at this week’s top 5 stories from around the MLB.

Alex Rodriguez wearing suit looking over his shoulder at ballfield
USA Today

A-Rod Chides Astros Players for Cheating

During Tuesday’s ESPN broadcast of the game between the New York Yankees and Boston Red Sox, fellow cheater, Alex Rodriguez, had some words to share concerning the Houston Astros’ 2017 sign-stealing scandal.

“I think the one thing that really has upset the fans is you cheat, you win a championship, there is no suspension, and then there’s no remorse,” A-Rod said.

“[Fans] want a real, authentic apology and they have not received that thus far.”

He later added, “You’ve earned all this negative talk. You’ve earned whatever comes your way, including whether it’s hit by a pitch or negative press. You have divorced yourself from having the ability to protect yourself.”

Rob Manfred during press conference with blue MLB backdrop
CBS Sports

MLB Has No Plans to Cancel Games Amid Coronavirus

Although major companies all over the world have announced they are either canceling or postponing conferences and events amid the coronavirus outbreak, MLB has no plans to cancel any games, according to ESPN’s Jeff Passan.

The league did release a memo with recommendations on how teams can protect themselves from the deadly virus, including “avoid[ing] taking balls and pens directly from fans to sign autographs” and “ensur[ing] all players have received the 2019-20 flu vaccine and are up-to-date on other vaccinations.”

Mike Trout in Angels uniform sitting with wife at outdoors press conference
Sports Illustrated

Angels Mike Trout Expecting Baby Boy

Mike and Jessica Trout are expecting their first child together in August. The Angels star center fielder took to Instagram and posted a video from last fall when his wife revealed that they were expecting a baby boy.

“I don’t even know where to begin… from seeing your heartbeat for the first time to seeing you dance around in mommy’s belly,” his Instagram post reads. “We are truly blessed and this is only the beginning!! Little man, you have the best mommy already and I can’t wait to be your dad!”

Christian Yelich highfiving teammates in dugout
Today’s TMJ4

Brewers’ Yelich Inching Close to Huge Extension

The Milwaukee Brewers and stud outfielder Christian Yelich are one step closer to finalizing a contract extension that will keep him in a Brewers uniform through 2028. This comes with a mutual option for the following year, according to Jeff Passan.

The extension is worth $215 million and is expected to be announced on Friday, per The Athletics’ Ken Rosenthal. Yelich is currently signed through 2021 with a club option for 2022. The extension will forgo the club option and add seven years to his stay in Milwaukee.

Trevor Bauer staring into nothing wearing Reds cap
Hiptoro

Reds’ Bauer Mocks Astros by Tipping Own Pitches

Cincinnati Reds starting pitcher Trevor Bauer hasn’t been shy in expressing his disgust with the Astros’ 2017 sign-stealing scandal. Bauer, in general, isn’t shy about expressing what’s going on in that head of his. However, his recent exploit took it up a notch.

During Monday’s Cactus League game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Bauer can be seen tipping his pitches with the flip of his glove right before he delivers to home plate. This way there is no doubt what pitch is coming, so the need for stealing signs is unnecessary.

Teammate Derek Dietrich revealed that Bauer’s intentions were not subtle and that he was purposefully tipping his pitches to Matt Beaty in the 4th inning.

“Trevor’s not too fond of [sign-stealing], so he figured he’s going to try something new this season,” Dietrich said during an in-game interview. “He’s going to start telling the batters what’s coming. That way there’s no ifs, ands, or buts about what’s going on. It’s just, ‘Here it comes, try to hit it.'”